Author Topic: Carbs to sugar conversion ratio question  (Read 18960 times)

Offline TallDog

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Carbs to sugar conversion ratio question
« on: January 17, 2012, 10:38:33 AM »
I know that digestible carbs end up as sugar in the blood stream. What I don't know is how to convert the amounts.

If you eat 10 grams of carbs, how many grams of sugar does that end up being in the blood?

Is it a 1 gram to 1 gram ratio, or is there some formula to determine the correct amount?

Offline Chris

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Re: Carbs to sugar conversion ratio question
« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2012, 12:33:16 PM »
I'm pretty sure 1g digested = 1g in blood. This applies to both starch and sugar. So 10g of carbohydrates from fruit will result in 10g of carbohydrates entering the bloodstream.

Any particular reason you're trying to find this out?


Offline Acumen Athletics

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Re: Carbs to sugar conversion ratio question
« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2012, 01:47:47 PM »
I'm assuming you're referring to the thermos effect of carbs?

Offline TallDog

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Re: Carbs to sugar conversion ratio question
« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2012, 03:03:36 PM »
I'm pretty sure 1g digested = 1g in blood. This applies to both starch and sugar. So 10g of carbohydrates from fruit will result in 10g of carbohydrates entering the bloodstream.

Any particular reason you're trying to find this out?

I was trying to explain to someone that you are only supposed to have about 1 teaspoon of sugar in your blood at any one time. So, if you ate some carbs it would raise you sugar level.

And of course they asked the obvious question: if it eat this candy bar, exactly how much will it raise my blood sugar level?

I am also, just curious.

My understanding is that the glycemic index is a rating of how fast a food's carbs convert to sugar, not of whether they all convert. My assumption is that all digestible carbs eventually end up as sugar in the blood stream, but I don't know for a fact that's true.

 

« Last Edit: January 17, 2012, 03:14:00 PM by TallDog »

Offline Warren Dew

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Re: Carbs to sugar conversion ratio question
« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2012, 08:40:28 PM »
1g of starch converts to 1g of blood sugar.  1g of table sugar converts to 0.5g of blood sugar in the short term, from the glucose half of the sugar, because the fructose half of the sugar goes to the liver to be processed.  The fructose is later processed either into fat or into more sugar, so in the long term, 1g of table sugar converts to somewhere between 0.5g and 1g of blood sugar.

However, blood sugar is also removed from the bloodstream when it's high - that's what insulin is for, to drive sugar, along with other nutrients, out of the blood stream and into muscle, fat, and liver cells.


Offline TallDog

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Re: Carbs to sugar conversion ratio question
« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2012, 07:16:04 AM »
1g of starch converts to 1g of blood sugar.  1g of table sugar converts to 0.5g of blood sugar in the short term, from the glucose half of the sugar, because the fructose half of the sugar goes to the liver to be processed.  The fructose is later processed either into fat or into more sugar, so in the long term, 1g of table sugar converts to somewhere between 0.5g and 1g of blood sugar.

However, blood sugar is also removed from the bloodstream when it's high - that's what insulin is for, to drive sugar, along with other nutrients, out of the blood stream and into muscle, fat, and liver cells.

Thanks, given your explanation, I feel I can use the 1 to 1 ratio as a "rule of thumb." 

I understand it's more subtle than that, but so are most things in life. It's important to understand the general rule before you dive into the details.