Author Topic: Paleo-Friendly Long-Term Food Storage  (Read 4888 times)

Offline GaryR55

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Paleo-Friendly Long-Term Food Storage
« on: March 05, 2008, 08:18:23 PM »
I originally posted this in the Miscellaneous forum, but got no responses, so I'm trying it out here:

Question: How does one store a year's supply of food for emergencies and remain paleo? Obviously, it would have to consist of canned and dried food, so, with those limitations, what canned meats, fruits and veggies can I stockpile and still avoid salt, sugar, grains, dairy, MSG, preservatives, etc, or is this simply impossible?

Gary

Offline PaleoRedHead

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Re: Paleo-Friendly Long-Term Food Storage
« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2008, 05:44:04 AM »
That's a good question... hmmm..

Canned fish in water (minimal salt sometimes)
Dried vegetables (until crispy and then placed in a food saver bag too keep fresh)

I'll keep looking around for items that can last for long periods of time... a year you'd like?


Offline suze

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Re: Paleo-Friendly Long-Term Food Storage
« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2008, 05:31:27 PM »
Buckwheat groats.

Offline GaryR55

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Re: Paleo-Friendly Long-Term Food Storage
« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2008, 10:27:15 PM »
Thanks for the suggestions, ladies.  ;D

I've done some more research on the problem and I think I know what I'm going to do now:

1. Get both a food dehydrator and a food sealer (either the Rival Seal-A-Meal or the FoodSaver; haven't decided which, yet)

2. Dry my meats, fruits and veggies

3. Vacuum seal everything

That should do it. No added salt or sugar, no grains or dairy. Strictly paleo.

By the way, what the heck are buckwheat groats? Doesn't sound very paleo to me.  ;)

Offline slbridges

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Re: Paleo-Friendly Long-Term Food Storage
« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2008, 10:33:17 PM »
Wouldn't things like canned wild salmon, canned tomatoes, be safer than the food you seal yourself? I wouldn't trust that stuff wouldn't leak in or grow, but I'm one of those people who washes their hands like six times while preparing raw meat. :P


Offline Lord Snoolington

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Re: Paleo-Friendly Long-Term Food Storage
« Reply #5 on: March 09, 2008, 11:56:31 AM »
If I was in a year-long emergency, whether I was eating Paleolithically would be my smallest concern. Stocking for it would not only be difficult in the finding of products, but in the expense of buying that amount of those types of food all at once. Depending upon just what type of emergency you're talking about and where you live, I'd consider including some plant seeds, so you could start a nice emergency-garden.

Offline GaryR55

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Re: Paleo-Friendly Long-Term Food Storage
« Reply #6 on: March 09, 2008, 04:43:00 PM »
Wouldn't things like canned wild salmon, canned tomatoes, be safer than the food you seal yourself? I wouldn't trust that stuff wouldn't leak in or grow, but I'm one of those people who washes their hands like six times while preparing raw meat. :P

I don't think so. The whole idea behind vacuum sealing food is to suck all the air out. It is the presence of air, or more correctly, oxygen, that causes the growth of bacteria and thus spoils the food. No air, no spoilage. That's why you vacuum seal food, in the first place.

The problem with canned foods is that they are loaded with salt, sugar and additives, defeating the whole objective of remaining paleo-friendly.

Offline GaryR55

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Re: Paleo-Friendly Long-Term Food Storage
« Reply #7 on: March 09, 2008, 04:57:50 PM »
If I was in a year-long emergency, whether I was eating Paleolithically would be my smallest concern. Stocking for it would not only be difficult in the finding of products, but in the expense of buying that amount of those types of food all at once. Depending upon just what type of emergency you're talking about and where you live, I'd consider including some plant seeds, so you could start a nice emergency-garden.

Why would it be any different, if you're canning or vacuum sealing? You just buy the same foods you ordinarily eat and put them away, that's all. As for how much you buy at a time, that all depends upon your budget and how soon you think you may actually need the survival rations. I tend to believe there is sufficient time in which to stockpile enough food to survive on for a year. I'm going to budget a certain amount each payday and, by a year from now, I should have enough. I would think the trick is buying in bulk as much as possible. It's cheaper and you can accumulate more food more quickly. For example, those pre-bagged green apples will make a lot of dried apple slices, as opposed to buying individual apples a few at a time. As for meat, that's a little more problematic. It's difficult to find fresh meats in bulk quantities, but you can buy packages of frozen or refrigerated meat and get six or eight good sized pieces at once. Just let it thaw completely before drying and sealing, of course. I know some say you should only use fresh meat, but unless you live on a farm, that's hard to do. Everything you'll find sold at any retail store is not fresh unless you're watching the butcher cut it before your eyes. Even then, it's at least several days old. But, if we're talking about survival rations, there's no room for being picky.

The importance of remaining paleo should be easily understood by everyone here. Think back to what you felt like before you went paleo and you'll have some idea of how you'll begin to feel if you start eating crap again. In a survival scenario, you want to be as close to physically fit as possible, not fat, weak and sickly.

Gary

Offline suze

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Re: Paleo-Friendly Long-Term Food Storage
« Reply #8 on: March 09, 2008, 09:04:14 PM »
The name "buckwheat" or "beech wheat" comes from its triangular seeds, which resemble the much larger seeds of the beech nut from the beech tree, and the fact that it is used like wheat.  Despite the common name and the grain-like use of the crop, buckwheats are not grasses and are not related to wheat.

That's from Wikipedia.  You can make flour from buckwheat.  It is a very ancient food, probably paleo.  I eat it sparingly, because the taste is quite strong.  But it will undoubtedly keep for a year.

Offline GaryR55

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Re: Paleo-Friendly Long-Term Food Storage
« Reply #9 on: March 11, 2008, 08:27:15 PM »
So, it's basically a seed, then (the edible part)? I read the Wikipedia article and noted the nutritional content, but I'm somewhat skeptical about it's being unlike wheat. Wheat also contains such vitamins and minerals, but is unfit for human consumption, due to the gluten. How significantly does buckwheat differ?

Gary

Offline kallyn

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Re: Paleo-Friendly Long-Term Food Storage
« Reply #10 on: March 12, 2008, 07:19:51 AM »
Buckwheat is not a grass, so it's not biologically related to the cereal grasses at all and it contains no gluten.  I've read that the buckwheat "grain" is actually, biologically, a tiny fruit.  However, it's still really starchy, has a fat content high enough that rancidity is a problem, and is allergenic if you eat too much of it.  So I tend to stay away from it.