Author Topic: Spicy Things That Aren't In The Nightshade Family  (Read 12570 times)

Offline Degarth

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Spicy Things That Aren't In The Nightshade Family
« on: April 24, 2011, 09:04:07 PM »
I REALLY like spicy foods. I use crushed red pepper in damn near everything. But, since I learned nightshades weren't paleo (so much to learn) I want to try to eliminate them all together just to see how I feel. If I have to give up spicy, I will. But is there something that is spicy (the spicier the better) that IS paleo? I buy radishes a lot and they are kind of spicy, but not that much and they don't really work for sprinkling on food. Is there anything that fits the bill? Spicy but not nightshade? Mustard seeds?

Offline UKtroglodyte

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Re: Spicy Things That Aren't In The Nightshade Family
« Reply #1 on: April 25, 2011, 12:13:33 AM »
From a website about avoiding nightshades:
http://www.getting-started-with-healthy-eating.com/no-nightshades-diet.html

There are many strong flavorings beyond the nightshades:
Garlic
Turmeric
Ginger
Chives
Onion
A no-nightshade Mexican flavor combination: Garlic, cumin, and basil


I would add mustard powder, horseradish, wasabi and cloves.

Of course don't forget the humble peppercorn: black, green, pink etc...
http://www.frontiercoop.com/prodlist.php?ct=frgourmet

I've also found that the longer I eat paleo, the more I can taste the actual food and the less seasoning/sauces I require.


Offline C C G

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Re: Spicy Things That Aren't In The Nightshade Family
« Reply #2 on: April 25, 2011, 04:05:10 AM »
A lot of people on here still eat nightshades.  I avoid them for my eczema but will have the occasional tomato, aubergine or chilli pepper, and can't say I notice any difference!

If you don't have joint issues, I'd say small doses of nightshades aren't going to do too much damage

Offline Kimbits

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Re: Spicy Things That Aren't In The Nightshade Family
« Reply #3 on: April 25, 2011, 04:22:41 AM »
I believe curries are Paleo, since they originate from the Asian/Middle Eastern areas

Offline kyleen66

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Re: Spicy Things That Aren't In The Nightshade Family
« Reply #4 on: April 25, 2011, 04:50:40 AM »
I still eat nightshades like green pepper and tomato. They are not optimal, but mostly it's for flavor. When I make my home made marinara - I do notice that my hands will turn read for a few hours. I only do that one or two times a month. My pain levels don't increase.

I don't seem to have any reaction to the green pepper or the chili peppers. I also don't seem to have an indication when I make a chili (beanless, of course). Of course, I will put the caveat on that it could be doing things physiologically that I don't notice.

Eventually my goal is to wean them out of my diet. This is a work in progress. :-D


Offline C C G

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Re: Spicy Things That Aren't In The Nightshade Family
« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2011, 05:28:20 AM »
I mainly use aubergines (eggplant) as a fat-absorbing device when I'm having something lean like liver or venison steak.  Aubergine + lamb mince is also a classic combo with mixed spices (cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, cumin etc.)

Speaking of curry, I'm making mutton curry tonight - can't wait!

Offline greenchild

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Re: Spicy Things That Aren't In The Nightshade Family
« Reply #6 on: April 25, 2011, 06:16:41 AM »
we can't have nightshades here.

if you really want to avoid nightshades - if you buy a commercially prepared curry seasoning, read the ingredient list, it often contains paprika.

Try grinding mustard seeds yourself for kick - it usually takes a day for the "hot" flavor to really set in to the food but when it does, watch out! :)

Black pepper is good, but I've found I have to use quite a bit more than I normally would to get any sort of heat from it. 

Offline Warren Dew

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Re: Spicy Things That Aren't In The Nightshade Family
« Reply #7 on: April 25, 2011, 08:26:09 AM »
Black and white pepper work well.  Freshly ground white pepper is quite spicy.

Offline greenchild

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Re: Spicy Things That Aren't In The Nightshade Family
« Reply #8 on: April 25, 2011, 12:44:20 PM »
Warren, moreso than black?  Maybe I'll have to go get some white pepper! :)  Any idea on the "gourmet" colored peppercorns?

Offline Jean

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Re: Spicy Things That Aren't In The Nightshade Family
« Reply #9 on: April 25, 2011, 02:38:37 PM »
Green, red, black and white pepper are all from the same plant. Green peppercorns are the unripe fruit. Red peppercorns are the ripe fruit. Neither are very hot, and the red are sweeter. Black pepper is made by fermenting then drying the unripe fruits. It is more aromatic. White pepper is made by picking the fruits almost ripe, soaking and removing the outer skin, then sun-drying. White pepper doesn't have as much aroma, but it has more bite.

Pink pepper is a different species - it has a piney flavour and isn't as hot.

There are also other peppery spices besides the regular peppercorns, like Guinea pepper, Szechuan pepper, sansho, Tasmanian mountain pepper, etc. Some of these have a numbing effect on the mouth.

Horseradish, mustard and wasabi have a more "explode your nose" effect.

Ginger and galangal can be quite hot when used in quantity.

Offline Flying Murse

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Re: Spicy Things That Aren't In The Nightshade Family
« Reply #10 on: April 25, 2011, 07:27:06 PM »
I'm a bit lost on the nightshade subject. I thought that they were only to be avoided if you had allergy/immunology or bowel issues.  Since I don't, what's the problem with them?

Offline Jean

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Re: Spicy Things That Aren't In The Nightshade Family
« Reply #11 on: April 25, 2011, 08:44:15 PM »
Some paleo eaters avoid nightshades as most of them are from the New World so were not eaten by humans during the paleolithic period.

I'm still transitioning to paleo so still eating them. Once I have my other issues sorted I plan to try cutting them for three months to see if it helps me. I have palindromic rheumatism so I'm hoping it will improve that, but if I don't see an improvement in three months (in that or in my general health) I'll eat them again.

Offline Flying Murse

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Re: Spicy Things That Aren't In The Nightshade Family
« Reply #12 on: April 26, 2011, 08:19:28 PM »
Some paleo eaters avoid nightshades as most of them are from the New World so were not eaten by humans during the paleolithic period.

I'm still transitioning to paleo so still eating them. Once I have my other issues sorted I plan to try cutting them for three months to see if it helps me. I have palindromic rheumatism so I'm hoping it will improve that, but if I don't see an improvement in three months (in that or in my general health) I'll eat them again.

Maybe I'm being stubborn and don't want to give up my peppers, but I'm still confused.  Clovis records indicate that humans were in north/south America at the end of the Upper Paleolithic era, and the recent Buttermilk Creek find in Texas moves the mark back several more thousand years.  So again I would ask "what's wrong with eating them?"  Will they cause me health issues or weight control problems since I don't have any joint, allergy, gut, or immunology issues?

I'm not trying to be an ass, but I enjoy these foods and don't want to give them up without a valid reason.

Offline Jean

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Re: Spicy Things That Aren't In The Nightshade Family
« Reply #13 on: April 26, 2011, 09:04:09 PM »
Personally I think you should do what suits you. If they're not causing any problems then there's no harm in eating them. The evolutionary logic is appealing - that we are best adapted to those foods we've been eating a long time - but that doesn't necessarily mean that every food we didn't have access to during that time is bad. Every body is different.