Author Topic: Sunflower oil  (Read 3391 times)

Offline shell_piece

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Sunflower oil
« on: June 08, 2009, 10:04:40 AM »
Whats the dealio with sunflower oil.. is it safe? I thought it being a veg oil it would be hydrogenated but I cant seem to find a definate source on this. Is it much different to olive oil?

marika

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Re: Sunflower oil
« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2009, 05:23:47 AM »
I think that it is a PUFA (poly-unsaturated fatty acid), like canola oil. From what I understand, animal fats are better, here's some info:

http://www.westonaprice.org/knowyourfats/index.html

Also this is interesting:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunflower_oil

Quote
A high consumption of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, which are found in most types of vegetable oil including sunflower oil, may increase the likelihood that postmenopausal women will develop breast cancer.[8] Similar effect was observed on prostate cancer.[9] Other analysis suggested an inverse association between total polyunsaturated fatty acids and breast cancer risk.[10]

Although on that same page, it looks like "High Oleic" sunflower oil is maybe better, based on the fatty acid ratio? I am still new to all this though!

I'm going to try to use more grassfed animal fats, it seems so much purer and less processed than oils, to me! :)
« Last Edit: June 10, 2009, 05:29:13 AM by marika »


Offline shell_piece

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Re: Sunflower oil
« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2009, 05:31:17 AM »
Yeah, its all a bit confusing alrite. I think the only main gripe with it is its poor omega 6 to omega 3 ratio. As far as hydrogenating goes i don't think it is, just polys as you say. I reckon I should be grand once I supplement my omega 3s...

marika

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Re: Sunflower oil
« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2009, 05:35:07 AM »
It looks like macadamia oil might be better though:

http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2008/10/beef-suet-good-source-of-fat-soluble.html

Quote
Here is the nutrition data for macadamia nuts. According to this, macadamia fat's 16% SFA, 77% MUFAs, and 2% PUFAs. Of the MUFAs, they have 74% oleic acid, and 22% palmitoleic acid. They're one of the few foods with significant palmitoleic acid. So although high-oleic sunflower oil may be cheaper, I would use macadamia oil as it's easier to find, less processed, and contains unique fatty acids.

http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/nut-and-seed-products/3123/2

But at the top of that page, they talk about how healthful beef tallow is, as it has vitamin K2 and D, as well as carotenes, so I still think maybe pure grassfed animal fats are probably more healthful (and more Paleo!). :D

Offline shell_piece

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Re: Sunflower oil
« Reply #4 on: June 10, 2009, 05:08:15 PM »
Yeah, I think beef tallow is the way to go alright. Definately more Paleo. Now if only there were such a thing as canned tuna in beef tallow :)


marika

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Re: Sunflower oil
« Reply #5 on: June 14, 2009, 05:04:36 PM »
Haha, yes - I bet that would taste great, actually!!

I found these two sites today, they are very informative. Apparently the ideal Paleo omega 6 to omega 3 ratio is 2:1. These sites talk about and even list the ratios for given oils and fats:

http://weightoftheevidence.blogspot.com/2006/10/omega-3-and-omega-6-food-sources.html

http://www.mendosa.com/blog/?p=324

It does look like tallow is good, the ratio is 5.7:1. Lard is 7:1. Mutton fat is very good (but where to get it??) 1.7:1. Canola oil looks good at 2:1, but I've read at Weston Price Foundation's website that it's genetically modified and highly processed, so probably best to avoid it.  Olive oil is 12.8:1, so not so good. Coconut oil doesn't even have any omega 3's, so I guess it's not so good to use? Macadamia oil looks amazing, with just a 1:1 ratio, and apparently it has a high smoke point so it's great for cooking with, but how is it processed? Anyway, I guess I'll stick with animal fats, since it has very little processing.

« Last Edit: June 14, 2009, 05:08:32 PM by marika »

Offline Warren Dew

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Re: Sunflower oil
« Reply #6 on: June 14, 2009, 09:07:39 PM »
It does look like tallow is good, the ratio is 5.7:1.

Note that that figure is for tallow from grain fed beef.  The figures I've seen for grass fed beef are in the 2:1 range.

Offline shell_piece

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Re: Sunflower oil
« Reply #7 on: June 15, 2009, 01:22:05 AM »
Haha, yes - I bet that would taste great, actually!!

I found these two sites today, they are very informative. Apparently the ideal Paleo omega 6 to omega 3 ratio is 2:1. These sites talk about and even list the ratios for given oils and fats:

http://weightoftheevidence.blogspot.com/2006/10/omega-3-and-omega-6-food-sources.html

http://www.mendosa.com/blog/?p=324

It does look like tallow is good, the ratio is 5.7:1. Lard is 7:1. Mutton fat is very good (but where to get it??) 1.7:1. Canola oil looks good at 2:1, but I've read at Weston Price Foundation's website that it's genetically modified and highly processed, so probably best to avoid it.  Olive oil is 12.8:1, so not so good. Coconut oil doesn't even have any omega 3's, so I guess it's not so good to use? Macadamia oil looks amazing, with just a 1:1 ratio, and apparently it has a high smoke point so it's great for cooking with, but how is it processed? Anyway, I guess I'll stick with animal fats, since it has very little processing.



Yeah coconut oil doesnt provide much omega 3s, but as far as healthy oils go, its one of the best, due to (AFAIK) its saturated fatty acid profile (44.6% lauric acid, 16.8% myristic acid , 8.2% palmitic acid and 8% caprylic acid). I use it for cooking, moisturising, and eating straight from the jar :) There was another thread too on here recently about it i think.

Also, interesting to note from the first link, the only sources of EPA and DHA omega 3s are from fish oils. Looks like they're probably the best bet to source your omega 3s.

But going back to the topic of sunflower oil.. Im about half way through Mark Sisson's new book The Primal Blueprint, where he explains.. apparently all PUFA oils (polyunsaturated fatty acid oil), ie corn oil, canola oil, are pro inflamatory and are bad for your health. So basically omega 6 oils are pro inflam, and omega3s are anti inflam.

marika

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Re: Sunflower oil
« Reply #8 on: June 15, 2009, 03:46:22 AM »
Quote
Note that that figure is for tallow from grain fed beef.  The figures I've seen for grass fed beef are in the 2:1 range.

Awesome, Warren Drew!! I'm getting 5 lbs. 100% grassfed tallow this Saturday at the farmers market! YEAH!!

Quote
Also, interesting to note from the first link, the only sources of EPA and DHA omega 3s are from fish oils. Looks like they're probably the best bet to source your omega 3s.....apparently all PUFA oils (polyunsaturated fatty acid oil), ie corn oil, canola oil, are pro inflamatory and are bad for your health. So basically omega 6 oils are pro inflam, and omega3s are anti inflam.

Hm, that is interesting! We do eat mackerel or saury at least twice a week, so that should do it. However, I can't imagine all Paleo man had access to fish, so maybe not that much of it is needed? That is also interesting about inflammatory oils!

P.S. I think I might have find a way to get mutton fat (actually lamb fat) at the farmers market!

ETA: I just found this great table that shows different fats and their omega ratio (scroll down for the table):

http://www.gofrolic.org/gofrolic/food_blog/Entries/2008/12/28_Cooking_Oil_101.html

ETA2: I just found this as well about how much essential fatty acids we actually need:

http://www.wolfrivernaturals.com/chris-masterjohn-special-reports.htm
Quote
Current reviews and textbooks call the omega-6 linoleic acid and the omega-3 alpha-linolenic acid “essential fatty acids” (EFA) and cite the EFA requirement as one to four percent of calories. Research suggests, however, that the omega-6 arachidonic acid (AA) and the omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are the only fatty acids that are truly essential. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) occurs in fish products but is probably not a normal constituent of the mammalian body, and in excess it interferes with essential AA metabolism.

...For women who are seeking to conceive, pregnant, or lactating, the EFA requirement may be as high as one percent of calories. In other healthy adults, however, the requirement is infinitesimal if it exists at all. The best sources of EFAs are liver, butter, and egg yolks, especially from animals raised on pasture.

..An excess of linoleate from vegetable oil will interfere with the production of DHA while an excess of EPA from fish oil will interfere with the production and utilization of AA. EFAs are polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) that contribute to oxidative stress. Vitamin E and other antioxidant nutrients cannot fully protect against oxidative stress induced by dietary PUFAs. Therefore, the consumption of EFAs should be kept as close to the minimum requirement as is practical while still maintaining an appetizing and nutritious diet.

I checked the two that it said ARE essential, and they are both available in grass-fed meats, eggs (and dairy).

« Last Edit: June 15, 2009, 04:08:11 AM by marika »

Offline shell_piece

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Re: Sunflower oil
« Reply #9 on: June 15, 2009, 06:10:33 AM »

ETA: I just found this great table that shows different fats and their omega ratio (scroll down for the table):

http://www.gofrolic.org/gofrolic/food_blog/Entries/2008/12/28_Cooking_Oil_101.html


ooh, not lookin too good for sunflower oil there.. reckon i may well just be leaving it out from now on then ::)

I Think It has Same Benefits as Olive Oil Instead Olive Oil is much Better than This SunFlower Oil Here I'm Mentioning Some Uses Of Olive Oil These are as Follows:

7 Common Uses of Organic Olive Oil
====================================

Besides what I’ve already mentioned above, you can find many surprising ways to use your organic olive oil.

   1. Cooking - Start using organic olive oil for cooking or as a replacement whenever a recipe calls for butter.
   2. Body Oil - Rub it on your body or face after washing. You don’t need a lot to get great skin moisturizing benefits. You might even trying shaving with it or using it to remove makeup.
   3. Control Hair Frizz, Dry Cuticles & Nails - Just comb a drop of organic olive oil through your hair to control flyaways and frizz. Rub it into nail cuticles and nails for a naturally polished look.
   4. Control a Nagging Cough or Scratchy Throat - Swallow a tablespoon to soothe a dry or irritated throat.
   5. Shine Stainless Pots & Pans - Organic olive oil will prevent streaking and tarnishing and naturally condition your pots and pans.
   6. Lip Balm - Organic olive oil is the perfect lip balm to keep chapped lips at bay. It’s also great to use on your hands as a soothing hand lotion in winter.
   7. Bath Oil - Add a few drops of organic olive oil to the water you’re running for your bath. The benefits to your skin will be obvious even after the first time you use it.


Ive read from a few sources that olive oil isnt supposed to be cooked with? Im not sure how true it is, but apparently its unstable and easily oxidised at higher temps, which promotes inflammation if ingested. I used to cook all the time with it before i read this. Now its all bout coconut oil   ;D

Offline JelBell

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Re: Sunflower oil
« Reply #10 on: December 10, 2020, 08:11:22 AM »
Quote
Note that that figure is for tallow from grain fed beef.  The figures I've seen for grass fed beef are in the 2:1 range.

Awesome, Warren Drew!! I'm getting 5 lbs. 100% grassfed tallow this Saturday at the farmers market! YEAH!!

Quote
Also, interesting to note from the first link, the only sources of EPA and DHA omega 3s are from fish oils. Looks like they're probably the best bet to source your omega 3s.....apparently all PUFA oils (polyunsaturated fatty acid oil), ie corn oil, canola oil, are pro inflamatory and are bad for your health. So basically omega 6 oils are pro inflam, and omega3s are anti inflam.

Hm, that is interesting! We do eat mackerel or saury at least twice a week, so that should do it. However, I can't imagine all Paleo man had access to fish, so maybe not that much of it is needed? That is also interesting about inflammatory oils!

P.S. I think I might have find a way to get mutton fat (actually lamb fat) at the farmers market!

ETA: I just found this great table that shows different fats and their omega ratio (scroll down for the table):

http://www.gofrolic.org/gofrolic/food_blog/Entries/2008/12/28_Cooking_Oil_101.html

ETA2: I just found this as well about how much essential fatty acids we actually need:

http://www.wolfrivernaturals.com/chris-masterjohn-special-reports.htm
Quote
Current reviews and textbooks call the omega-6 linoleic acid and the omega-3 alpha-linolenic acid “essential fatty acids” (EFA) and cite the EFA requirement as one to four percent of calories. Research suggests, however, that the omega-6 arachidonic acid (AA) and the omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are the only fatty acids that are truly essential. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) occurs in fish products but is probably not a normal constituent of the mammalian body, and in excess it interferes with essential AA metabolism.

...For women who are seeking to conceive, pregnant, or lactating, the EFA requirement may be as high as one percent of calories. In other healthy adults, however, the requirement is infinitesimal if it exists at all. The best sources of EFAs are liver, butter, and egg yolks, especially from animals raised on pasture.

..An excess of linoleate from vegetable oil will interfere with the production of DHA while an excess of EPA from fish oil will interfere with the production and utilization of AA. EFAs are polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) that contribute to oxidative stress. Vitamin E and other antioxidant nutrients cannot fully protect against oxidative stress induced by dietary PUFAs. Therefore, the consumption of EFAs should be kept as close to the minimum requirement as is practical while still maintaining an appetizing and nutritious diet.

I checked the two that it said ARE essential, and they are both available in grass-fed meats, eggs (and dairy).
big thanks for your post