Author Topic: Tamarind  (Read 3696 times)

Offline ajmesa

  • Major
  • ***
  • Posts: 844
  • Karma: 3
    • View Profile
    • Email
Tamarind
« on: February 19, 2010, 03:58:42 PM »
I found some tamarinds from Thailand in the market today. I used to eat these really often in Cuba when I was a kid, they grow easily there (called tamarindo in Cuba). I get home and start eating a couple and realize the box it came in had a nutrition label. When I looked at it I was amazed because it had 13 g of fat? As far as I know tamarinds (the pulp, the part you eat) are just pure sugar. Then I was even more amazed at reading this:

Trans Fat 2g

What the hell? How is that possible? They come in a box, unshelled (meaning they still have the shell on). The pulp (part you eat) is completely surrounded by the shell, how the hell does it have trans fat?

I am starting to believe the nutrition label is wrong. I have always thought tamarinds are just loaded with sugar and have no fat (like many fruits, very little fat). Should I give it away or just ignore the label?

Offline Warren Dew

  • Global Moderator
  • General
  • ****
  • Posts: 5499
  • Karma: 359
    • View Profile
Re: Tamarind
« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2010, 05:23:20 PM »
There are natural trans fats too, some of which are even good for you.  Still, few fruit have much fat, much less trans fat, and I'm surprised if tamarinds have fat in them.  I think I'd take a bite just to see if I could tell.


Offline ajmesa

  • Major
  • ***
  • Posts: 844
  • Karma: 3
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Tamarind
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2010, 06:27:11 PM »
There are natural trans fats too, some of which are even good for you.  Still, few fruit have much fat, much less trans fat, and I'm surprised if tamarinds have fat in them.  I think I'd take a bite just to see if I could tell.

I had some, Idk, I highly doubt those tamarinds have ANY fat. Those things are sweet as hell.

Offline Wlfdg

  • Global Moderator
  • General
  • ****
  • Posts: 1921
  • Karma: 164
  • Rhabdo - Catch it at a Cro$$fit today
    • Yahoo Instant Messenger - split.therapy
    • View Profile
Re: Tamarind
« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2010, 06:41:03 PM »
NutritionData.com says for 1 cup of pulp 1g. of fat/ 0 trans fat
http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/2070/2

Offline ajmesa

  • Major
  • ***
  • Posts: 844
  • Karma: 3
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Tamarind
« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2010, 06:55:23 PM »
NutritionData.com says for 1 cup of pulp 1g. of fat/ 0 trans fat
http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/2070/2
Hey thanks, it also shows the ton of sugar it has. :( I guess the label is wrong.


Offline Lone_woLf

  • Captain
  • ***
  • Posts: 629
  • Karma: 19
  • Walking backwards into the future.
    • View Profile
Re: Tamarind
« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2010, 09:53:24 AM »
I have done some reading about tamarind and carob and I'm wondering if you guys think these two foods are paleo even though they're from the fabaceae family (legumes), because we eat the pods and not the beans. And couldn't this be a rationale for eating green beans as well, since at an immature stage you are eating mostly pod?

Offline Warren Dew

  • Global Moderator
  • General
  • ****
  • Posts: 5499
  • Karma: 359
    • View Profile
Re: Tamarind
« Reply #6 on: February 20, 2010, 03:29:12 PM »
Interesting question, Lone_wolf.

I consider green beans to be nonpaleo, but not as terrible a cheat as beans where one is primarily eating the seeds.

I hadn't realized that tamarinds and carob were from the legume family.  I've never had occasion to eat them much.

Offline ajmesa

  • Major
  • ***
  • Posts: 844
  • Karma: 3
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Tamarind
« Reply #7 on: February 20, 2010, 04:04:49 PM »
As far as I am aware, they hang from a tree and in season they are really abundant (the tree is full of them). A caveman would have definitely eaten them. It is a seasonal delicacy so I don't eat much of it.