Author Topic: Deadlifts = Dead back  (Read 14014 times)

Offline apurdy79

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Re: Deadlifts = Dead back
« Reply #15 on: September 16, 2012, 04:33:53 AM »
From what I have seen Crossfit favors speed over form and function.  In the real world of weight training, if you can't hold your form, you failed the lift and should stop.  Crossfit has you keep going regardless of the form and that causes injury specially to the new lifter.  That is why I am not a fan of Crossfit.

Im sorry but I totally disagree with this. It is a huge misconception to believe that we, as crossfitters sacrifice form for speed.  More than likely your core became tired and you've activated muscles that possibly have never been utilized before. Take your time with the deadlifts and remember not to round your back over because it puts your shoulders over or parallel to the bar which makes you use your back to lift the weight and not your legs. Stick with it and you will see tremendous improvements. Hot baths and heat packs will heal your pain much quicker! good luck!

Offline Thunderchild

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Re: Deadlifts = Dead back
« Reply #16 on: October 03, 2012, 06:21:02 AM »
I have hurt my back in the past doing deadlift's. I now do them with a trap bar. No back problems anymore and I do not scrape my knees. It keeps my form strict as well.

 8)



Offline Big Pete HKC

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Re: Deadlifts = Dead back
« Reply #17 on: August 13, 2013, 01:28:03 AM »
Hey all,

New to crossfit, about 6 weeks in. Did deadlifts on Sunday morning, and now it's Thursday and my back has been killing me since Monday. :-[

I am positive my deadlift form got more horrendous as I got tired, and I know this is why my lower back has been very painful. I saw a chiropractor on Tuesday, who attributed my pain to being a new weight lifter and said it should go away soon.

I'm wondering how all you experienced cave people have handled a similar injury.

Thanks!

WallyslilWifey,

The best advice I can give you is to turn a swift 180 from the world of Crossfit and run away! Seriously though, the fact that they have you taking a grinding strength movement like the Deadlift, put as much weight as possible on the bar, and then do it for reps in a set amount of time is absolutely absurd, since it lends itself to bone shattering injuries like this one...

I did hear recently that one of Crossfit's elite trainers, Joshua Bunch, came out in an article on breaking muscle.com and said that to do Crossfit is to play with the "thrill" of perhaps getting an injury, and that physical agony is just the price you pay to be "fit."

I love heavy deadlifts. But not “for time”. I love Olympic lifting. But not “for time”. To rep these out “for time” limits the major functions of these movements (to increase limit strength and raw power) and promotes a minor function traditionally unrelated to both the deadlift and Olympic lifting; this is to say a metabolic endeavor, which is better served by, well, just about anything else, really.

Even worse than the pain in your back will be the pain of ignorance. Your chiropractor was probably smiling when he told you you would be fine, because them and orthopedic surgeons love Crossfit...It is one of their biggest customers. If any trainer EVER tells you that pain and injury are necessary in their chosen system, slap them in the face, ask for a refund, and head for the hills, because they or their system have NO INTEREST in your health.

Offline titanium

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Re: Deadlifts = Dead back
« Reply #18 on: November 27, 2013, 01:58:27 PM »
Someone mentioned this may be the DOMS (delayed onset of muscle soreness).  That may or may not be true.  The DOMS do not show up that day... they manifest themselves 24-48 hours after the lift session and should dissipate within 24-48 hours.  If your pain is immediate/same day and is not getting better it probably is not the DOMS.

Deadlifts can be very injurious to the low back/L1-S5.  This will happen if the weight is too high; speed is too high; and/or form breaks down resulting in a rounding of the low back instead of maintaining the natural curve (think stick your butt out).

I don't think I've seen the type of deadlift that was done.  If your goal is to strengthen the glute max then you should definitely be doing bent knee deadlifts (as opposed to straight leg which loads the hamstrings).  Up to 40 percent of the glute max is attached to the illio-tibial (IT) band.  In order to actually fire those fibers of the glutes the knee needs to be bent 25 degrees to create the necessary tension in the IT band so the glutes have a solid anchor point.

The #1 reason for back surgery is back surgery.  Take care of your back and choose your exercises wisely.  Load, # repetitions, speed/tempo (eccentric and concentric), #sets and rest between sets (and workouts) are all valid parameters to vary your workout.  Beginner lifters should use a slow tempo (3-4 seconds on the eccentric phase of the lift) with higher rep counts (12-15 reps) and choose a load that they can manage fairly easily for the entire set/session.

For new lifters, much of the strength gain early on is a result of neurological adaptation... the brain is able to fire more of the fibers of the muscle, than it is mitochondrial (ability to burn energy).  Enjoy each lift and stay healthy.

Offline Eric

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Re: Deadlifts = Dead back
« Reply #19 on: November 29, 2013, 06:02:39 AM »
I still deadlift but find that foam rolling the glutes and groin area is necessary every month or two at absolute worst, otherwise I get odd tightness/feelings in those areas!



Offline Big Pete HKC

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Re: Deadlifts = Dead back
« Reply #20 on: November 29, 2013, 10:49:41 PM »
It fully depends on what you are training the Deadlift for as well, as in what are your goals?

Crossfitting aside, as one of the most knowledgeable trainers I know once said, "An exercise program's effectiveness increases in direct ratio to the amount of stuff you leave out that shouldn't be there." Since the deadlift is an Olympic lift that is EXTREMELY taxing on the Central Nervous System, does it make sense for your goals to do it for high reps and suffer the muscle strain? It seems to me that, like what you said before, you see a direct correlation between three factors: number of deadlift reps done, amount of fatigue during those reps, and those fatigued reps with bad form causing subsequent muscle pain/injury.

Dan John (whose work every person who trains should look at) says "Plan the Hunt, Hunt the Hunt, Assess the Hunt." There is clearly a weak link in the chain and it is good you have discovered it now. I am interested to hear how you re-evaluated your program.

Offline Hoss

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Re: Deadlifts = Dead back
« Reply #21 on: December 08, 2013, 05:25:05 AM »
In my younger days, I competed in several strongman competitions.  The event I always dreaded was the deadlift for reps event as it would wreck my body for days afterwards.  Highly technical lifts like the barbell clean and jerk, snatch, and deadlift done for high reps is just asking for injury and is darn irresponsible to be urged to do in my opinion.

If you still wish to train in this manner, I'd recommend switching to sumo deadlifts over conventional.  It's a lot more forgiving on the body to bang out reps in sumo than conventional.

Offline Eric

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Re: Deadlifts = Dead back
« Reply #22 on: December 08, 2013, 05:45:09 AM »
Hoss, can you speak more to this please?

I've never sumo deadlifted but i often do 2-3 warmup sets of traditional deadlifts followed by 4 sets of roughly 8 reps each.  NOW, i don't lift much compared to some shorter, beastier dudes with my long a$$ arms and legs, but wondering your thoughts.
« Last Edit: December 08, 2013, 08:51:50 AM by Eric »

Offline Hoss

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Re: Deadlifts = Dead back
« Reply #23 on: December 08, 2013, 08:56:48 AM »
Eric, do you mean deadlifts for reps or sumo deadlifts?

I can't really explain sumo better than Dave Tate does here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qp8Sx9dX9LM

Basically while conventional is more of a back lift, sumo ends up being more of a glute and leg lift so it's not quite so hard on your lower back and more forgiving in that respect.  It also shortens the ROM a little bit.  Because it's more forgiving and you can do more reps safer with it than conventional, it's actually banned in most strongman competitions for rep events.

As for repping out on the deadlift, the more tired you get the more your form suffers.  And the last thing you want to be doing is having your form going down the toilet when you're doing an exercise that for the most part allows people to move the heaviest weight they can.

Offline Big Pete HKC

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Re: Deadlifts = Dead back
« Reply #24 on: December 08, 2013, 08:07:14 PM »
As for repping out on the deadlift, the more tired you get the more your form suffers.  And the last thing you want to be doing is having your form going down the toilet when you're doing an exercise that for the most part allows people to move the heaviest weight they can.

Hoss is right on here. Putting the central nervous system under the stress required to move heavy loads in an Olympic manner is bad enough, but when you start adding in fatigue, bad things tend to happen rather quickly. The last thing anyone should really do is turn a complicated strength movements with a low "margin of safety" (that is, if you f*ck something up, you are pretty much screwed) for metabolic work is straight asinine.

Offline Eric

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Re: Deadlifts = Dead back
« Reply #25 on: December 12, 2013, 05:13:32 PM »
See also my post on Crossfit vs. Bodybuilding.

It gets a lot of hits/searches from Google folks, in the many thousands.

Offline a bulldog

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Re: Deadlifts = Dead back
« Reply #26 on: October 14, 2014, 09:11:55 PM »
In my younger days, I competed in several strongman competitions.  The event I always dreaded was the deadlift for reps event as it would wreck my body for days afterwards.  Highly technical lifts like the barbell clean and jerk, snatch, and deadlift done for high reps is just asking for injury and is darn irresponsible to be urged to do in my opinion.

If you still wish to train in this manner, I'd recommend switching to sumo deadlifts over conventional.  It's a lot more forgiving on the body to bang out reps in sumo than conventional.
This post says it all really.
Definitely switch to sumo DLs if you're going to continue on the CF path.

Deadlifts themselves, are an awesome exercise, when performed in a controlled and concentrated manner. Form is everything, because real life changing injury is one wrong move away.


Offline BobbyT

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Re: Deadlifts = Dead back
« Reply #27 on: June 23, 2016, 08:48:03 AM »
Dead lifting is one of the best movement pattern for your body but the danger is if your form is not perfect you are going to severely hurt your back just as you did. When you notice that your form is not perfect anymore that is when it is time to stop it is important not to push yourself with these movements. I truly hope you feel better and be safe!