Author Topic: Am I Eating Right On A Workout Day? Feedback Please!!  (Read 2710 times)

Offline Patrickg213

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Am I Eating Right On A Workout Day? Feedback Please!!
« on: February 23, 2008, 12:50:00 AM »
For Breakfast Ill have a nice big bowl of fruit. This usually contains at least 4 different types. I don't buy organic because the regular ones are made to have more sugar which = more simple carbs... is that true?? Then its time to hit my workout. Usually it's for about 3 hours but im not constantly lifting, just walking around while I take little breaks. Im trying to figure out if I should Drink my pure protein shake (30g protein, 1g sugar, 3g fat, 3g carbs) before, after, or immediatly after the workout. Any answers and reasons?? After I'll chow down the lean meat. I prefer fish, turkey, chicken, and occasionally some beef. Once I get home Ill cook up some eggs, and the quantity depends on how intense my workout was and how hungry I am. Somewhere in the day Ill throw in the veggies and the nuts, but only the good ones. I have been doing the caveman thing for 2 months now and I feel great and 30 pounds lighter. This has pretty much been my eating schedule on workout days and on my resting days I will do a little swimming (about 1 hour), and have the similar foods just not as much. Does that work?? I saw that someone posted a study that says weight training is for a long time is just as good as running, jogging, etc. I have been doing that because of a torn ligament in my ankle so am I not missing out?? PS I have lost 30 lbs (Im 6'0 was 218 down to 188 and I have muscles) without doing anything but weight training and the occasional swim so I would believe it!!
If you can reccomend a deviation in my routine please let me know. Thanks!!

Offline PaleoRedHead

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Re: Am I Eating Right On A Workout Day? Feedback Please!!
« Reply #1 on: February 25, 2008, 09:01:52 AM »
I personally think it's important to eat plenty of meat in the morning as well as fruit, for example... but it sounds like you eat the meat right after working out in the morning, so that's probably fine.

Also, it is advisable to not eat more than 1-2 eggs a day and no more than 6 a week. There are several reasons, but mainly because eggs were not a staple in our paleo ancestor's diet.

"Cardio" is absolutely not required to lose weight. In fact, it is doing strength training (with conditioning strength training included in a weekly workout routine) can burn more fat in the long run... especially hours after a workout. Plus, muscle burns more fat than bodyfat does... so the more muscle mass, the better.

We as humans are not meant to run for long periods of time. Our ancestors walked great distances and ran for short bursts. That is why HIIT (High Intensity Interval Training) is probably the best form of cardio for us. (i.e. Fartlek)
« Last Edit: February 25, 2008, 09:05:21 AM by PaleoRedHead »


Offline PaleoRedHead

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Re: Am I Eating Right On A Workout Day? Feedback Please!!
« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2008, 09:13:46 AM »
I don't buy organic because the regular ones are made to have more sugar which = more simple carbs... is that true??

I have my reservations about that..
I know that organic produce contains more nutrients on average than non-organic. I think more nutrients is far more important than more sugar, if what you said is true. I have not found anything that supports the claim that regular contains more sugar. Please share links/citations if you have some.

Here is some more information I found:
US researchers reported that organic foods, both fruits and vegetables, have been found healthier than conventionally grown crops.

They spent ten years studying and comparing organic and standard foods. They found that organic tomatoes contained nearly double the quantity of flavonoids, antioxidants found to prevent diseases such as heart disease and cancer than standard tomatoes. They measured the levels of quercetin and kaempferol in dried tomato samples and found that the average levels in organic tomatoes were 79 % higher for kaempferol and 97 % higher for quercetin over the ten years. It has been reported in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that the levels of flavonoids increase in samples from organic treatments over time while the levels of flavonoids do not change significantly in conventional treatments.

It is believed that such benefits of organic foods occur due to non-use of fertilizers and because of the over use of fertilizers by conventional farmers. Flavonoids are being produced by plants when they lack nutrients and when the crops receive a large supply of nutrients in the form of fertiliser, there is little need for the natural production.

Other studies have also found that organic foods contained higher levels of nutrients. Organic kiwis were found to have significantly higher levels of vitamin C and organic peaches to have a higher content of polyphenols, another oxidant.
Such studies have influenced consumers to turn to such products in recent years.

The UK’s health foods sector has increased its sale in recent years due to the increased media attention about the “superfoods” and the health benefits of vitamins and other dietary nutrients.
Just to mention Britain’s largest supermarket, Tesco, whose organic food sales increased by 40 % last year and whose organic fruit and vegetables make about 10 % of all foods.

Here is another article that supports this:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2006/03/25/HOG3BHSDPG1.DTL