Author Topic: Dman's Extremist Meat-and-Fruit Paleo Journal  (Read 8303 times)

Offline Warren Dew

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Re: Dman's Extremist Meat-and-Fruit Paleo Journal
« Reply #45 on: November 21, 2012, 12:40:53 PM »
Sounds like you've found a way to do paleo inexpensively and well!

My only comment is that modern fruit tends to be lower in vitamin C than wild fruit.  You might consider a vitamin C supplement - though with the rare meat, it may be unnecessary.

Offline dman

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Re: Dman's Extremist Meat-and-Fruit Paleo Journal
« Reply #46 on: December 14, 2012, 04:01:10 PM »
Sounds like you've found a way to do paleo inexpensively and well!

My only comment is that modern fruit tends to be lower in vitamin C than wild fruit.  You might consider a vitamin C supplement - though with the rare meat, it may be unnecessary.

Thanks for the feedback, Warren.  I'm aware that modern fruit tends to be lower in vitamin C than wild fruit.  However, I probably ingest more vitamin C in its natural form than 99.9% of the human population, given that I probably eat more fruit than 99.9% of the human population, and also because I am picky about fruit and only buy fruit that is very flavorful.  I trust my instincts to tell me when and how much vitamin C to ingest, in its natural state, rather than some nutritionist with a chart and a bottle of pills. 

That said, I often find that even the high-quality fruit I buy doesn't give me the antioxidant-punch that I'm looking for, in which case I revert to juice.  This is sometimes the case after I eat a large portion of cooked meat.  Presumably, my body is looking for copious amounts of antioxidants to balance out the oxidation inherent in cooking flesh.  I prefer to eat food that is as unadulterated as possible, so I avoid juice when possible, but sometimes my body will accept nothing else.

On the other hand, I just ate a pound of medium-well New York steak (I prefer medium-rare, but the meat was only a half-inch thick and very juicy, so I couldn't get a good sear in my non-stick, non-toxic pan without overcooking the inside or using added fat, which I refuse to do).  But I followed it up with a couple of bright red prickly pear fruits, and I felt no need for juice.  In fact, I felt better eating the prickly pears, because juice tends to be either too acidic (e.g., orange, pineapple), too sweet (e.g., apple), or not acidic enough (e.g., carrot).  So maybe if I make an extra effort to get extra-flavorful fruit like these prickly pears, I won't feel the need to drink juice anymore.  We'll see...


Offline dman

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Re: Dman's Extremist Meat-and-Fruit Paleo Journal
« Reply #47 on: December 14, 2012, 04:27:38 PM »
UPDATE:

For a few weeks, I was living off mostly grass-fed ground beef (15% fat and 25% fat), rib meat (ribeye steaks and rib roasts), and mussels (broiled frozen green-lipped New Zealand mussels, and steamed live Prince Edward Island black mussels).  Plus lots of fresh fruit and fruit juice (see the post before this one for thoughts about fruit vs. juice).

Eventually, I got sick of the ground beef, rib meat, and mussels.  Now, the thought of any of those foods nauseates me.  I guess I got my fill :)

More than getting my fill, though, I think there are other reasons why I got sick of those items.  Often times, when I cook a ribeye steak or rib roast, there's part of the meat that is literally nauseating—it just tastes off.  I used to think it was spoiled meat, but now I'm not so sure.  I've had this experience with multiple butchers, using grass-fed rib meat from multiple sources.  I'll find myself enjoying a ribeye steak or rib roast and then I'll hit a bite that tastes disgusting.  Oftentimes, this bite will have connective tissue—gristle, I suppose.  Perhaps this is all it is.  Regardless, it has me not want to eat rib meat anymore.  Plus, it's not as tender as the cuts from the short loin: filet mignon, strip steak, t-bone, and porterhouse.  I used to prefer rib meat—including short ribs—because they tend to be fattier than short loin cuts.  However, this was when I let the butcher choose the cuts for me.  Now, I am choosing the cuts for myself (my current butcher sells them pre-cut, vacuum-packed, so I can choose my ideal steak), and so I can choose fattier cuts.

As I mentioned in my last post, I just ate a pound of well-marbled, medium-well New York steak (I prefer medium-rare, but the meat was only a half-inch thick and very juicy, so I couldn't get a good sear in my non-stick, non-toxic pan without overcooking the inside or using added fat, which I refuse to do).  Man, it was amazing.  Way better than the ribeye steaks and rib roasts I've been cooking: way more tender, without the disgusting, off taste (there was a small piece of gristle, but I just tossed it). 

Filet mignon costs twice as much as New York strip steaks, so I can't afford it on a regular basis.  However, for only a dollar more than the New York steaks per pound, I can buy porterhouse steaks.  Of course, I'm paying for the bone, but about a third of the meat on a porterhouse is actually filet mignon (the rest is strip steak).  Plus, it's about twice as thick as the New York steak, so I don't think I need to worry about overcooking the center.

I used to buy t-bone steaks, but my butcher just educated me that a porterhouse is virtually identical to a t-bone, but with a higher ratio of filet mignon to strip steak.  And since the price for the porterhouse is the same as the t-bone at my local butcher, the choice is obvious :)

As for mussels, I was loving them, but then I had a couple of bad experiences.  I ate a few of the broiled frozen green-lipped ones undercooked—still a bit cold—and was grossed out.  And then, last night, I got lazy and let the fishmonger check for dead ones, and then neglected to double-check for dead ones when I got home.  I have a feeling I ate a few dead ones, because I felt a bit sick afterwards, and am now disgusted by the idea of mussels altogether.  Hopefully, I'll either regain my affection for mussels, or find a suitable substitute, because they're super-easy, super-fresh, super-healthy, super-tasty (as I recall), and super-cheap (relative to other wild seafood).  I wish I could afford live or fresh crab, live lobster, live crawdads, live oysters, live prawns and shrimp, fresh or live geoduck clams, and fresh sea urchin gonads, because those are some of my favorite foods on earth, but unfortunately, my budget no longer includes such delicacies.  I suppose I'll keep searching for a wholesaler nearby who has a reasonable minimum and doesn't require a retailer's license, because I'm missing these foods dearly.  Still, I can't complain too much, since I found a wholesale butcher who sells grass-fed beef at less than a third of the price as the other butchers.

As far as fruit is concerned, lately, I've been appreciating variety.  For awhile, I was just eating grapes, but eventually, I got sick of them.  Lately, I've been buying small quantities of lots of fruits.  Right now, I have a few prickly pears (aka, tunas, cactus fruit), a small papaya, a cantaloupe, a tangerine, an organic fuji apple (wish I could afford more organic produce, but oh well), a tangerine, and a small Mexican guava.  I also have a quart of unpasteurized orange juice, and a half-gallon of pineapple juice in my fridge, but as I mentioned in my last post, I'm starting to move towards eating more fruit and hopefully getting juice out of my diet altogether.

That's all for now!  Feedback is most welcome :)

Offline Warren Dew

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Re: Dman's Extremist Meat-and-Fruit Paleo Journal
« Reply #48 on: December 15, 2012, 08:04:24 PM »
For steak, I also find that strip steaks with adequate fat are superior to rib eyes.

In my opinion, rib meat is best consumed as part of a rib roast with the ribs on.  When cooked with the ribs down, this allows the cooking to penetrate to the connective tissue that's below the outermost layer of meat, which helps make that connective tissue tender, while the bones protect the meat on the bone side and allow it to stay rare.

As a result, I've pretty much given up on rib eye steaks and boneless rib roasts.  If I want less expensive steak, I go for top sirloin.

Offline dman

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Re: Dman's Extremist Meat-and-Fruit Paleo Journal
« Reply #49 on: December 15, 2012, 09:41:05 PM »
For steak, I also find that strip steaks with adequate fat are superior to rib eyes.

In my opinion, rib meat is best consumed as part of a rib roast with the ribs on.  When cooked with the ribs down, this allows the cooking to penetrate to the connective tissue that's below the outermost layer of meat, which helps make that connective tissue tender, while the bones protect the meat on the bone side and allow it to stay rare.

As a result, I've pretty much given up on rib eye steaks and boneless rib roasts.  If I want less expensive steak, I go for top sirloin.

Makes sense.  Thanks for that perspective, Warren.  Unfortunately, my local butcher receives his grass-fed beef from the farmer with the bones already removed.  But now that I, like you, am enjoying strip steak more than rib meat, I don't think I'll be eating much rib meat anyway.

By the way, I did what I said I'd do and got a porterhouse today.  The tenderloin side of the porterhouse was amazingly tender, as predicted, and tasted fantastic.  The strip steak side of the porterhouse was too dry, simply because it wasn't well-marbled.  This just reaffirms for me how important marbling is.  If I can find a well-marbled porterhouse (or t-bone) in the future, I'll buy it, but if all I can find is a well-marbled New York strip steak, I think I'll be buying that, because it seems like marbling is what makes or breaks a grass-fed steak (except for filet mignon, which seems the be delicious regardless).

Thanks again for the feedback, Warren.


Offline dman

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Re: Dman's Extremist Meat-and-Fruit Paleo Journal
« Reply #50 on: December 31, 2012, 07:45:42 PM »

Offline dman

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Re: Dman's Extremist Meat-and-Fruit Paleo Journal
« Reply #51 on: January 03, 2013, 08:27:04 PM »
For details on my latest trials and tribulations, see the link in the last post.  For now, though, I'll summarize what I'm eating these days:

-Fresh (never frozen) wild king salmon bellies and trimmings, pan-fried in their own fat, drained on paper towels

-1-inch-thick 100% grass-fed filet mignon with fat attached, pan-fried in their own fat, cooked medium-rare

-Satsuma tangerines with leaves attached (not sure why, but I greatly prefer them with the leaves attached)

-tunas (aka, cactus fruit, prickly pears), both red and green

-other fruits, such as raspberries and kiwis
« Last Edit: January 03, 2013, 08:47:00 PM by dman »

Offline Paleo

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Re: Dman's Extremist Meat-and-Fruit Paleo Journal
« Reply #52 on: January 12, 2013, 06:02:54 PM »
Great Paleo strategy! I too have been logging my journey by posting all my recipes up on my blog.

Offline dman

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Re: Dman's Extremist Meat-and-Fruit Paleo Journal
« Reply #53 on: January 17, 2013, 04:43:53 PM »
What I'm eating these days:

-1-inch-thick 100% grass-fed well-marbled NY steak with visible fat removed, pan-fried over high heat in a non-toxic, non-stick pan with no added fat, cooked medium-rare

-live black mussels, thrown into a pot over high heat, with a lid on, until they open ($3 per pound in 5-pound bags from Costco, of all places; best price I've found retail, and also the tastiest I've found; they're smaller than the Prince Edward Island ones, which I think leads to better taste, and are also probably fresher because they come from Washington state and I live on the West Coast)

-Satsuma tangerines with leaves attached (not sure why, but I greatly prefer them with the leaves attached)

-other local fruits, such as grapes and strawberries

Plus, my newest creation:

Roasted beef fat.  I buy slabs of 100% grass-fed beef fat custom-cut from my butcher for a dollar a pound.  He saves it for me when he cuts up the steaks.  He charges me only a dollar a pound.  I prefer it with no meat attached.  I slice it into a couple of thinner slabs (preferably about 1/8 inch), put it on a wire rack on top of a baking pan, then throw it in the oven at 300 degrees for 1-1.5 hours.  It comes out looking like fried pork rinds (aka, chicharron), but much healthier and even more delicious :) 

The rendered fat that falls into the pan can be saved in a jar in the fridge or a cool dark place for frying (it's called tallow), but since I don't fry, I just toss it.