Author Topic: kallyn intro  (Read 3863 times)

Offline kallyn

  • General
  • ****
  • Posts: 1248
  • Karma: 74
    • View Profile
    • Caveman Food
    • Email
kallyn intro
« on: September 08, 2006, 04:39:15 PM »
I posted a few times already, but I figured I should post here too.  :)

I am 23 years old, female, and living with my darling hubby.  I became interested in nutrition a few years back due to experiencing nasty side effects of a cardiovascular nature after about 3 months of vegetarianism.  I've been hooked on reading about food ever since.  I come from an academic background of geology and anthropology, so I found that the paleo diet in particular seemed to just make the most sense to me and appealed to my inner scientist.

Even though I first read about the paleo diet probably 3 years ago, I have not yet fully adopted it.  Whatever foods that I eat that are non-paleo, though, I try to prepare according to traditional methods such as those found in the book Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon.  This includes soaking/sprouting grains and nuts and legumes, only consuming unpasteurized dairy, making fermented foods, etc.  I am not perfect in this, but I try to do the best that circumstances will allow.  I also limit my carbohydrate intake to under approximately 70g/day (although it is usually much less than that).  I have found all of this to be a very gradual process, as I came into all this as a poor college student with zero cooking skills, limited kitchen availability, and vegetarianism-induced heart problems.

I'll be moving very soon to a much bigger living space in an area that is particularly crunchy.  I'm looking forward to getting a chest freezer in this newfound space and purchasing a 1/4 of a grassfed cow or something similar.  :)  In fact, I hope to eventually do 95% of my shopping directly from organic/grassfed farmers.

Most of my interest up to this point has been nutrition, not exercise.  I'm particularly interested in the idea of intermittent fasting.  Even though I've been disregarding exercise up til now, I'm starting to get a bit annoyed with my squishiness and general sedentariness, so I'm thinking exercise is my next goal to tackle.

Nice to meet you all!

Offline Orc65

  • Sergeant
  • **
  • Posts: 155
  • Karma: 8
    • View Profile
Re: kallyn intro
« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2006, 08:10:31 PM »
Welcome to the world of real food. :)


Offline Manupright

  • Corporal
  • *
  • Posts: 60
  • Karma: 3
    • View Profile
Re: kallyn intro
« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2006, 03:46:07 AM »
This includes soaking/sprouting grains and nuts and legumes

I too occasionally eat grain foods, but I'm not clear on the soaking/sprouting process. Are there particular types of grain that need to be used? How long is each process supposed to take, optimally? Am I right in thinking that the sourdough bread I sometimes see in shops is similar in quality to soaked/sprouted grains?

My understanding is that nuts (a palaeo food, of course) are more nutritious (or less anti-nutritious) after being soaked and roasted. I tend to eat them raw, however, because I prefer the taste of them that way (with the possible exception of almonds). I assume that all will be well so long as I'm not cramming my face with low-grade cereal foods.

Offline kallyn

  • General
  • ****
  • Posts: 1248
  • Karma: 74
    • View Profile
    • Caveman Food
    • Email
Re: kallyn intro
« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2006, 10:36:04 AM »
I too occasionally eat grain foods, but I'm not clear on the soaking/sprouting process. Are there particular types of grain that need to be used? How long is each process supposed to take, optimally? Am I right in thinking that the sourdough bread I sometimes see in shops is similar in quality to soaked/sprouted grains?

My understanding is that nuts (a palaeo food, of course) are more nutritious (or less anti-nutritious) after being soaked and roasted. I tend to eat them raw, however, because I prefer the taste of them that way (with the possible exception of almonds). I assume that all will be well so long as I'm not cramming my face with low-grade cereal foods.

According to sources I've read, all grains need to be soaked, sprouted, or fermented in order to neutralize the phytates.  Some grains require a bit more processing than others.  Oats, for example, I generally soak for 24 hours in acidulated water (for the acid I use lemon juice most of the time).  Rice I believe needs 2 hours of soaking.  Wheat is more problematic because of the gluten protein and requires days of processing, as in sourdough.  You are correct in that traditional long-rising sourdough is properly prepared.  However, a lot of commercial sourdough is done with yeast and a quick-rise method, which is not desirable.  If the ingredients say yeast, you don't want to eat it.

Not only are nuts more nutritious after being soaked, the soaking also neutralizes their enzyme inhibitors.  You don't need to roast them afterwards, though.  You can dehydrate them or stick them in the lowest temperature your oven has to dry them out.  Then you can have the best of both worlds.  :)

I think that not cramming your face with low-grade cereal food is a major key to health!

Anyway, sorry to sound like an encyclopedia.  I unfortunately tend to do that sometimes.   :-[

Offline Manupright

  • Corporal
  • *
  • Posts: 60
  • Karma: 3
    • View Profile
Re: kallyn intro
« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2006, 01:02:50 PM »
Thanks.

Don't apologise for sounding like an encyclopedia. I always strive to sound like one myself when the opportunity presents itself!

I had heard that nuts could be dehydrated or dried at the lowest oven temperature, and recall experimenting with the latter. They were still soggy after an hour, and I lost patience and turned the oven up to 180 degrees (and then left them for too long and had to discard the charred remnants)! If I try again, about how long should they be left for?


Offline kallyn

  • General
  • ****
  • Posts: 1248
  • Karma: 74
    • View Profile
    • Caveman Food
    • Email
Re: kallyn intro
« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2006, 01:39:15 PM »
I had heard that nuts could be dehydrated or dried at the lowest oven temperature, and recall experimenting with the latter. They were still soggy after an hour, and I lost patience and turned the oven up to 180 degrees (and then left them for too long and had to discard the charred remnants)! If I try again, about how long should they be left for?

They usually need 8-12 hours in the oven on the lowest temperature, which is why I prefer to use the dehydrator.  :)  They really do come out extremely delicious, though!  They take on a nice crispy quality, but without the roastiness.  Almonds are my favorite.

Offline Manupright

  • Corporal
  • *
  • Posts: 60
  • Karma: 3
    • View Profile
Re: kallyn intro
« Reply #6 on: September 09, 2006, 01:50:26 PM »
Right. A dehydrator it is, then!

I'm quite partial to pistachios myself, although I ate too many of them this afternoon (I think they were ready-roasted).