Author Topic: paleo thought  (Read 4166 times)

Offline standingwolf

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paleo thought
« on: September 03, 2014, 09:38:44 PM »
If everyone ate the paleo diet, there wouldn’t be enough food source to support 7 billion people. Not sure if here in the states we could feed our own without running out of room. On second thought, there are more pets in this country than people. Cats alone, over 100 million. Here kitty, kitty, kitty........I'm kidding!

Offline Eric

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Re: paleo thought
« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2014, 07:06:49 PM »
I like your sense of humor, welcome to the forum!


Offline abbot

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Re: paleo thought
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2014, 05:32:29 PM »
Yeah, I've run into the earth-can't-support-the-human-population-if-everyone-ate-paleo argument before. The solution those who make this argument usually suggest is universal embracement of a vegetarian diet. The key problem with that is that population growth forecasts typically show a point where famine hits even if we are all eating our veggies, so to speak. The assumption is that cutting-edge agricultural technology and innovation will keep us ahead of the curve so that we can avoid world-wide starvation. Or if not avoid it indefinitely, then at least for our lifetimes, creating another problem (like pollution) that we get to dump on the next generation.

The thing to remember is that it is this very move towards an agrarian grain-based diet that has allowed for explosive population growth. Now that (thanks to a heavy vegetarian diet) humanity has hit the point where we are literally too big for us all to return to a hunter-gatherer diet then... that means no one should eat a hunter-gatherer diet? The people who make those arguments are obviously misguided.

However the other side of the argument is this: the goal of paleo maybe shouldn't be to convince everyone of the need to go back to a hunter-gatherer diet. Clearly the vegetarians are right about one thing: the earth can't sustain a hunter-gatherer population the size of the human race. But they do need to be reminded maybe that it wasn't the eating of meat that led to human overpopulation, but instead the eating of grain.

And again this is tough because it was the agricultural revolution that started us on the path we are on, giving us our current level of technology and our repository of human knowledge. Who's to say that without the agricultural revolution we ever would have developed the combustion engine. Or hell, even writing? It's a mixed bag, but here we are. I guess the take-away is that we should be informed and make the best decisions for ourselves individually, being aware that trying to make dietary decisions for the whole population is a very complicated notion.
   
« Last Edit: September 07, 2014, 05:35:32 PM by abbot »

Offline standingwolf

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Re: paleo thought
« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2014, 05:33:22 PM »
Additionally, the hunter-gatherer diet would be difficult where some if not billions of people live today. Which explains why Paleolithic Man never went past the 40th parallel north. The grain diet helped make the leap into colder, harsher climates possible. As you said, hence the population growth if not explosion. Well, there's no turning back now.
I hope I'm not boring people with my Paleo thoughts.

Offline Warren Dew

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Re: paleo thought
« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2014, 10:52:36 AM »
Actually paleolithic man made it right up to the edge of the glacier.  Paleolithic artifacts have been found at 60 degrees north.


Offline standingwolf

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Re: paleo thought
« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2014, 02:22:46 PM »
Just artifacts, no human remains? Guess once they realized how friggin cold it was, they dropped everything and took off. Or maybe it was a ski trip gone wrong.

Offline Warren Dew

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Re: paleo thought
« Reply #6 on: September 09, 2014, 04:04:06 PM »
Apparently stone tools hold up over the millenia better than bones do, so there are a lot more of the tools around.