Author Topic: Paleofantasy  (Read 17958 times)

Offline Warren Dew

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Re: Paleofantasy
« Reply #45 on: March 19, 2013, 02:12:40 PM »
John Hawks claims her book is good, so I'll at least leave open that possibility, however remote.

Sort of.  His bottom line is that paleofantasies are good, since that's all paleoanthropology really is at the moment, and that's still kind of the opposite of the bottom line of the book.

I do agree with him that Zuk writes well.  I'm torn on whether a book that exploits good writing to send a false message is a good thing or a bad thing.

Quote
The agenda remark is fair, because she herself has said that she has a feminist agenda, though she portrays it as a counterbalance to existing male bias. That still strikes me as more of a political stance than a scientific one. What do you think? Is that a proper mindset for a scientist?

I don't think it is, and I don't see honest researchers like Cynthia Kenyon making comments like that.

I personally think Zuk is a "feminist" only in the politically correct sense, where it's all tied up with the idea of killing animals to eat their flesh being a masculine thing.  A real feminist would be looking at things like the evidence that females participated in the hunt in paleo times.

Offline tinknal

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Re: Paleofantasy
« Reply #46 on: March 19, 2013, 04:01:17 PM »
John Hawks claims her book is good, so I'll at least leave open that possibility, however remote.

Sort of.  His bottom line is that paleofantasies are good, since that's all paleoanthropology really is at the moment, and that's still kind of the opposite of the bottom line of the book.

I do agree with him that Zuk writes well.  I'm torn on whether a book that exploits good writing to send a false message is a good thing or a bad thing.

Quote
The agenda remark is fair, because she herself has said that she has a feminist agenda, though she portrays it as a counterbalance to existing male bias. That still strikes me as more of a political stance than a scientific one. What do you think? Is that a proper mindset for a scientist?

I don't think it is, and I don't see honest researchers like Cynthia Kenyon making comments like that.

I personally think Zuk is a "feminist" only in the politically correct sense, where it's all tied up with the idea of killing animals to eat their flesh being a masculine thing.  A real feminist would be looking at things like the evidence that females participated in the hunt in paleo times.

I agree.  The worst kind of pseudo-scientist is the one that comes to a conclusion and then creates "data" to support it.  Feminists hate gender roles, except when those roles support their theories.  They want it both ways and get offended when one suggests that this is not reasonable.


Offline paleophil

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Re: Paleofantasy
« Reply #47 on: March 19, 2013, 06:55:59 PM »
Heck Phil, I only used the word "witch"  to avoid using the other "itch" word....................... ;)
I know it's standard fare for the Internet and hope I didn't come across as tut-tutting. It just occured to me that by not commenting on it I might leave the impression that I was condoning it.

Sort of.  His bottom line is that paleofantasies are good, since that's all paleoanthropology really is at the moment, and that's still kind of the opposite of the bottom line of the book.
Good point. Has anyone read Hawks' review?

---

Based on what I've seen so far, it is at least theoretically possible that Zuk thinks she's helping ancestral dieters by trying to aim us in the right direction, however misguidedly. I haven't read the book, so I'm leaving open the possibility that there could be more positive stuff in it than what's in her articles, interviews, reviews of her book, etc. Plus, her raising of the rapid evolution issue generated some interesting refutations from Paul Jaminet, Kevin Holbrook and Richard Nikoley and all publicity is good publicity, so the book is probably a net plus for spreading and understanding of the ancestral health concept.
« Last Edit: March 19, 2013, 07:38:54 PM by paleophil »

Offline samjohn

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Re: Paleofantasy
« Reply #48 on: March 20, 2013, 06:47:17 PM »

Offline JayJay

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Re: Paleofantasy
« Reply #49 on: April 08, 2013, 08:47:02 PM »


Offline Wingman

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Re: Paleofantasy
« Reply #50 on: December 10, 2014, 12:17:14 PM »
This thread has been wonderfully entertaining!  This thread is the reason I decided to join, so thank you all for such wonderful posts.  All the posts are insightful, thought out and equally important, well written.

I have been searching for more articles and references on or authored by Zuk and if I come across anything that has not been posted, I will post them here for you all.

best regards,
J

Offline paleogray

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Re: Paleofantasy
« Reply #51 on: January 28, 2015, 08:29:32 PM »
Regardless of what's written in that book, I have to say that I feel better on Paleo than I ever have. I think people are spending too much time trying to point out why the diet is a dangerous fad. Truth be told when people talk against Paleo; it's like saying processed foods and lab created foods are good for you. Just doesn't make sense to me. Regardless of what's in the book, I'm Paleo all the way.

Offline Eric

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Re: Paleofantasy
« Reply #52 on: September 17, 2016, 05:19:34 AM »
Looks like it's selling for $0.01 (1 cent) on Amazon now.
Fitting