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Messages - Eric

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1
Diet and nutrition / Re: Almond Butter
« on: November 13, 2017, 06:56:35 AM »
If you get one of the really good blenders (Vitamix) you can easily make your own almond oil.
They have huge motors and are fairly loud but do serious blending work (you can blend golf balls, etc. - it's seriously a beast)

I agree that palm oil (in addition to its harvesting being destructive) shouldn't be in an almond butter mix. 

2
Research / Re: Infertility may have been around as long as agriculture
« on: November 10, 2017, 08:21:17 AM »
Always test the cow out before you "buy" ...  ;)

3
Introductions / Re: Still Alive and Thankful.
« on: November 10, 2017, 08:20:57 AM »
Amazing Milfred!  Welcome to our site - and thank you for sharing your story.

Please keep us up to date as you continue your journey!   :D

4
Introductions / Re: Hello cave people!
« on: November 09, 2017, 03:29:34 AM »
Very cool man.  I am getting older too.  Can you believe I read/found out about this stuff back in like 2003-2004?  Wow!

Are you also doing any exercise or getting physical activity?  I'd encourage at least more standing if not more walking as well if you don't do "zoo human" exercises (aka the gym)  :police:

5
Recipes and meal photos / Re: Chili-Garlic Chicken Skewers
« on: November 08, 2017, 05:36:28 AM »
Man, have chicken i was going to cook tonight.

Thanks!  Will try

6
Introductions / Re: Hello everyone
« on: October 29, 2017, 05:29:17 AM »
Really appreciate the info you're sharing - neat to have outsider views compared to USA, though many of us here are from other parts as well.

What brought you toward Paleo - how has your life played out in the Netherlands. 
Does your area suffer similarly to the USA with obesity, diabetes, and similar afflictions?

Again, nice talking with you!  8)

7
Introductions / Re: Hello everyone
« on: October 28, 2017, 08:59:41 AM »
So is the takeaway that eventually you run out of other people's money?  :)

What country do you live in?


8
Introductions / Re: Hello everyone
« on: October 28, 2017, 05:42:04 AM »
Hi there and welcome!

You had commented about your government changing food prices or regulations being an impact on your diet.
Can you share more details?

Great to have you here!

9
Diet and nutrition / Re: Bugs...
« on: October 28, 2017, 05:40:46 AM »
Interesting post!  But not as weird as you may think.

Insects are a huge protein source in less developed areas and I believe the UN and other large government sources have claimed it's the best bet heading forward for feeding 6,7... 10 billion people.  Actually, some text I just read said they "urge" us to consider it strongly.

There are 1,900 edible insects varieties.  I've heard fried locusts are popular. 

Here is a link to their PDF entitled Edible Insects:  Future Prospects for Food and Feed Security
http://www.fao.org/docrep/018/i3253e/i3253e.pdf

And here are the Top 8 insects to try apparently  :D

1. Beetles

The most commonly eaten beetles are the long-horned, june, dung, and rhinoceros varieties. These are munched by people living in the Amazon basin, parts of Africa, and other heavily forested regions, both tropical and temperate, as diverse species are easily found in trees, fallen logs, and on the forest floor. (Native Americans, I've heard, would roast them over coals and eat them like popcorn.) They are efficient at turning cellulose from trees (indigestible to humans) into digestible fat. Beetles also have more protein than most other insects.

2. Butterflies and Moths

They do more than look pretty fluttering across a meadow; these winged insects, during their larval and pupal stages, are succulent and full of protein and iron. They're very popular in African countries, and are an excellent supplement for children and pregnant women who may be deficient in these nutrients. In Central and South America, fat and fleshy agave worms, which live between the leaves of the agave plant and turn into butterflies, are highly sought after for food and as the famed worm dropped into mescal, a Mexican liquor. Cultivation of these worms could help protect them from overharvesting.

3. Bees and Wasps

We love bees for their honey, but they have more to give. Indigenous people in Asia, Africa, Australia, South America, and Mexico commonly eat these insects when they are in their immature stages. Stingless bees are most commonly munched, with wasps a distant second. Bee brood (bees still in egg, larval, or pupal form tucked away in hive cells) taste like peanuts or almonds. Wasps, some say, have a pine-nutty flavor.

4. Ants

You're probably thinking that it takes a lot of ants to make a meal. True. But they pack a punch: 100 grams of red ant (one of thousands of ant species) provide some 14 grams of protein (more than eggs), nearly 48 grams of calcium, and a nice hit of iron, among other nutrients. All that in less than 100 calories. Plus, they're low in carbs.

5. Grasshoppers, Crickets, and Locusts

Grasshoppers and their ilk are the most consumed type of insect, probably because they're simply all over the place and they're easy to catch. There are a lot of different kinds, and they're a great protein source. The hoppers have a neutral flavor, so they pick up other flavors nicely. Cricket curry, anyone? Meanwhile, locusts move in swarms that devastate vegetation in countries where people are already struggling to eat—one of several reasons to turn them into dinner. (See video: Family prepares a cricket stir-fy.)

6. Flies and Mosquitoes

Not as popular as some of the others, these insects—including edible termites and, yes, lice—still have a place at some tables. Flies that develop on various types of cheese take on the flavor of their host, and the species from water habitats may taste like duck or fish.

7. Water Boatmen and Backswimmers

Easy to cultivate and harvest, these cosmopolitan little guys deposit eggs on the stems of aquatic plants, in both freshwater and saltwater environments—even in stagnant water. The eggs can be dried and shaken from the plants to make Mexican caviar (tastes like shrimp), or eaten fresh for their fishy flavor.

8. Stinkbugs

If you can get past the funky smell, these insects apparently add an apple flavor to sauces and are a valuable source of iodine. They're also known to have anesthetic and analgesic properties. Who would have thought?

10
Diet and nutrition / Re: Paleo kid away for the weekend
« on: October 05, 2017, 04:36:43 PM »
Hi there, wishing your daughter the best in her recovery and new lifestyle goals :)

I'd go with "socially acceptable" Paleo or Paleo-ish things since she's a 12 year old girl with friends.
You don't want her to feel like an outsider or be called "weird" - I understand girls at that age..

Perhaps beef jerky - there are so many varieties and types.  Or pepperoni.  Apples.  Fruit that travels well.  Dried fruit if you must.  Celery and almond butter or similar.  I second the eggs (hardboiled) suggestion.

Good luck - let us know!   Oh, also could try those tuna pouches - some have seasoning on them.

11
Introductions / Re: New to Paleo looking for some advice
« on: July 28, 2017, 05:14:51 PM »
CQ - welcome.

In this case - and I hate when I got this advice years ago - but I'd say to please just Message or visit your personal physician if possible.  Just to let them know of your new lifestyle and diet and to ensure nothing serious is going on.

I do doubt that it's anything serious but please keep us up to date with how you're feeling...

and WELCOME!      8)

12
Research / Re: Dietary fat causes inverse effect on cholesterol
« on: July 26, 2017, 05:57:05 PM »
Hmm, interesting.  It is just a number.  One to keep mind of but not many ailments are worth throwing drugs down your throat immediately.  Like he says, all drugs have side-effects.

I always say sugar is worse than fat anyway to people in day to day life.  I mean, it's true.

13
Introductions / Re: Hello!
« on: July 23, 2017, 01:23:01 PM »
Hey Nick, welcome!

How'd you find out about Paleo and what had you tried before that?

Great to see you here  :)

14
Diet and nutrition / Re: very discouraged. please help.
« on: June 03, 2017, 04:48:44 AM »
This is the last thing you want to hear right now.

But I would say to stick with Paleo for now - do NOT count your carbs.

Again, take a breath - you don't want to hear this right now.  But slow and steady wins the race.

Please check back with us shortly - let me know how it's going again

15
Introductions / Re: Just starting this thing
« on: April 24, 2017, 01:30:39 PM »
Steph Curry?!  Ha   ;)

Welcome!  Please ask LOTS of questions and DON'T get discouraged.  This is a huge change - for the better.  No matter how strict you get.

Look forward to following your journey

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