Author Topic: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091217141312.htm  (Read 3699 times)


Offline Paleo Curmudgeon

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Re: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091217141312.htm
« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2012, 10:53:07 AM »
The key statement here is Wild Grains and Tubers.  Grains are not what they were 100,000 years ago or just 1,000 years ago.


Destor

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Re: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091217141312.htm
« Reply #2 on: February 10, 2012, 06:24:04 AM »
Personally, I have never doubted that early homo sapiens were consumingwild plant materials (that require processing) in some amount but that it probably didn't account for any large portion of their diets.

Not all grains are equal either;  I think wheat is a particularly nasty one.  This "sorghum" they were processing sounds much more benign.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2012, 09:19:32 AM by Destor »

Offline Jean

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Re: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091217141312.htm
« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2012, 05:00:29 PM »
Thanks Destor, that's very interesting. I agree about wild vs cultivated grains, and modern wheat being worse than ancient wild grains. I think this is evidenced by the relative frequency of allergies to various grains; wheat and other gluten-containing cereals and corn are right up there, whereas allergy to tubers or millet is quite rare.

Also, use of grains found growing wild would have made them a much smaller percentage of the diet than the amount eaten on a neolithic or modern grain-based diet.

Offline Warren Dew

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Re: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091217141312.htm
« Reply #4 on: February 10, 2012, 09:21:29 PM »
Anyone have a link to the actual paper?  Last time there were headlines like this about starch granules on tools, the actual data didn't distinguish between use as food and use for other purposes, such as using the straw for bedding or roofing.

Agreed regarding the difference between wild and domesticated plants.  As a kid, I used to strip the grass seeds off grass with my teeth sometimes, but it would have been hard turning that into a substantial fraction of my food intake.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2012, 09:23:22 PM by Warren Dew »


Offline JayJay

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Re: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091217141312.htm
« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2012, 06:46:41 AM »
Warren,

Here is a more detailed article titled, "Mozambican Grass Seed Consumption During the Middle Stone Age" by Julio Mercader

http://www.ucalgary.ca/mercader/files/mercader/Mozambican Grass Seed ConsumptionDuring the Middle Stone Age.pdf

It has reference links to supporting materials.

Edit: Sorry, you'll have to copy/paste the link. It has spaces which did not parse correctly to form the entire link.
« Last Edit: February 11, 2012, 08:14:32 PM by JayJay »