Author Topic: Military pre-emptive training  (Read 5241 times)

Offline RyanElLion

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Military pre-emptive training
« on: September 05, 2011, 01:04:07 PM »
I plan on going into either the air force or the coast guard within the next year, i want to get my body in peak shape for the basic training.

I think they like high ASVAB scores in addition to athletic young men.

They focus on sit-ups, pushups, and pullups. They also include running if i can master these basics, i'll be set.

Better yet if i can go beyond these basics they'll want to enlist me as a paratrooper or rescue swimmer. :D

"A journey of a Thousand miles begins with a single step." -Lao Tzu

Today I did some sprints, I don't have any real endurance yet, but I plan on getting that endurance TOUGH... and spartan like.

At the very least I will be doing the upper body workout alternated with running, then sundays off. I will eventually be progressing beyond that, I assume rather quickly too.

I think i will start either the 100 pushup challenge or the 50 pullup challenge, either one i can build upon to get better, situps should be a piece of cake.

Any suggestions for getting Military fit or for the military in general... Thanks A lot :D

Offline RyanElLion

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Re: Military pre-emptive training
« Reply #1 on: September 05, 2011, 01:04:49 PM »
What i currently look like


Offline Bearso

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Re: Military pre-emptive training
« Reply #2 on: September 05, 2011, 02:36:47 PM »
Do you have access to weights?  Lifting weights will get you into KILLER SHAPE.  Overhead lift, squats, bench, deadlift...along with the body weight work you have outlined should do.  Cardio will be really good for militayr as well.  They run a LOT...!  A good hard body will do wonders for you.

Offline Chris

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Re: Military pre-emptive training
« Reply #3 on: September 05, 2011, 03:33:10 PM »
I'm going to answer some of your points to the best of my ability. Don't take them as fact, just information and points of view I have gathered over a period of time :)

Do Push Ups, Sit Ups, Pull Ups and Running
If those are the four things that you are going to be marked on, then those need to be the primary focus of your training. It won't matter if you can squat your bodyweight with weights (but weights WILL help, more on that in a moment) if you can only do 10 push ups. Focus on those four elements and train specifically for them -- strength endurance, endurance and cardiovascular fitness.

Avoid Training to Failure
For a real life athlete -- such as the military, police, fire service -- training to failure is both unnecessary and counter-productive. What's the use of a soldier if he can't chase down the enemy because his muscles are fried from training the day before? In the military, you need to able to perform day in and day out. Your training should focus on sets and reps that challenge your strength-endurance but do NOT wear your body out to the point of failure.

Strength Training to Improve Running and Strength-Endurance
I highly recommend strength training 2 times a week if you can. The focus, as you'll be doing a lot of work with push/pull/sit ups, should be on the two biggest lifts: deadlift and squat. Both of these exercises require a muscle contraction across the whole of your body and will train the legs and lower back effectively - two areas that will likely be neglected from focusing solely on push/pull/sit ups. I can also talk from personal experience that squats WILL improve your running phenomenally! Strength is great in that it carries over well into other areas of fitness -- you will notice the difference in your running once you start squatting. Regarding sets and reps, go for 3x5 and, as said earlier, avoid training to failure.

Training Push Ups, Sit Ups and Pull Ups
This isn't something you necessarily have to do but I believe is a good training protocol for strength endurance.
Set yourself a number of reps you want to do for an exercise. For example, "I want to be do 500 reps of push ups every week, Mon-Fri."
500 reps over 5 days = 100 reps a day.
Workout the maximum reps you can do in a set before hitting failure; e.g. 20 reps per set.
Thus, you perform 5 sets of 20 reps each day, Mon-Fri, in order to complete 500 reps that week.
Do the same thing for each exercise, taking into account the level of strength-endurance you have for each (pull ups will likely be less reps; sit ups possibly more reps than push ups).

Every week, assess how you're doing. Are you capable of doing more reps in each set without going to failure? Can you increase the total reps you do every week for each exercise? Are you pushing yourself too hard with an exercise? Take into account these things, assign new numbers for the week, and repeat the cycle.

Oh, and historically, Spartans trained daily ;)

Finally: Make Haste, Slowly
A lot of people are always in a desperate sprint to the finish line, whether it's getting bigger, stronger, more endurant, etc. Fitness is a marathon, not a sprint. The human body has a set recovery schedule that does not alter. When you push these boundaries too hard and too often, that's when you plateau or, worse still, run into injuries - short term and long term. Listen to your body. If you feel fried every week, reduce your weekly load of training. A week off from training can boost recovery and give you a hard-earned break. Perhaps your body takes longer to adapt to training - stick to the reps/sets/weight you are doing for another week or two and adapt from there. Your body is the best gauge you have.

Hopefully a few of these things will help you! Don't take them as solid golden rules, use your own judgement and other people's advice to make up your mind on a routine that suits you and your lifestyle :)



As an idea of a weekly schedule you might want to try, taking into account the above, here's an example:

(Assuming a weekly target of 500 push ups, 500 sit ups and 100 pull ups...)

Monday: Across the day: 100 push ups, 100 sit ups, 20 pull ups. Squat and Deadlifts - 3x5
Tuesday: Across the day: 100 push ups, 100 sit ups, 20 pull ups. Running/Sprint Training
Wednesday: REST
Thursday: Across the day: 100 push ups, 100 sit ups, 20 pull ups. Squats and Deadlifts - 3x5
Friday: Across the day: 100 push ups, 100 sit ups, 20 pull ups. Running/Sprint Training
Saturday: Across the day: 100 push ups, 100 sit ups, 20 pull ups. Running/Sprint Training
Sunday: REST

You may prefer to train Mon-Fri and have the whole weekend to rest. The above has a rest day on Wednesday; a mid-week day of rest is often useful :)

Offline RyanElLion

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Re: Military pre-emptive training
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2011, 08:06:21 AM »
I've got to check on the access to weights i WAS a member of the YMCA, but i haven't been in months idk if my Father took me off the membership.

Yesterday I did my max on my pushups (32) and on squats (87)

i'm going to find out about the membership, i'm going to do my max on sit-ups.

I can't do pullups at home anymore... i have one of those door gyms and it's destroying the door, it WILL break soon, i need to do my pullups at the gym...

I'll rejoin if i'm not still a member.


Offline RyanElLion

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Re: Military pre-emptive training
« Reply #5 on: September 13, 2011, 08:55:29 PM »
I'm still a member of the gym :D I will be squating REAL WEIGHTS, but for now my bodyweight squats are actually kicking my ass.

I am still recovering from a workout 2 days ago, i don't think i've ever worked out the right way before that, because I was NEVER sore the next day, NOW i know what real training is like...

Offline RyanElLion

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Re: Military pre-emptive training
« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2011, 05:38:28 PM »
I haven't been resting my body (for an entire day yet) yesterday i had to do some running for my job, and today i did a little bit of heavy lifting, tomorrow i'm off, i'll have a much needed day of rest, then i will be heading to the gym friday.

Be sure to check out my diet journey in progress reports and photos under "Ryan's Neanderthin Journey"

Offline RyanElLion

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Re: Military pre-emptive training
« Reply #7 on: September 15, 2011, 05:01:45 PM »
My workout today consisted of: (all in pounds)
-Overhead presses
3X5 110, 115, 4 reps with 120
-Dips
3X10 reps bodyweight
-Squats (taking it slow with these)
1 set of 5 with 125, 1 set with 20 reps of 135
(I would have done 3X5 but last time i pushed myself on the squat i pulled something, almost had a hernia)
-Farmers walk (walking with the dumbells held at my sides)
80 pounds for 50 seconds
-leg raises
-10 reps bodyweight

Afterwards had some figs (6) and one orange

Offline Spax

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Re: Military pre-emptive training
« Reply #8 on: December 06, 2011, 07:21:06 AM »
http://www.guardianbookshop.co.uk/BerteShopWeb/viewProduct.do?ISBN=9780852651186

Buy this book, it's endorsed by the British Army and has a weekly fitness plan broken into three levels of fitness and has variations on each exercise to make it easier or harder. The army use a lot of body weight fitness, endurance, and flexibility exercises, isolation weight training won't be that beneficial really.

The British Army is known for its rigorous fitness exams, and are arguably the most strict bar the French Foreign Legion.