Author Topic: Spite's Workout Tracker  (Read 2415 times)

Offline Spite

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Spite's Workout Tracker
« on: November 26, 2011, 12:46:28 PM »
This is my workout tracker. Here I'll write down entries about what my fitness life looks like. My workouts are usually identical, varying no more than 5-10 pounds from one workout to the next, so what I'll probably do is just write the program out once with some good explanations and the occasional update of numbers and then just focus on writing about my fitness life in general. You know, motivation and such.




Offline Spite

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Re: Spite's Workout Tracker
« Reply #1 on: November 26, 2011, 01:08:36 PM »
The workout program:

All moves are done in a 3x10 set/rep scheme, with each set ascending by 10 pounds. The workout is done roughly every other day. When a given move becomes overly easy at the current weight, I do a fourth set of 5 reps of 10 pounds more than I used for the third set. If I can also do that very easily, I add 5 pounds to the original 3 sets and just keep doing that for a while until after several workouts it gets easy again. This set/rep scheme makes me bigger, stronger, leaner, faster and more enduring. I like it a lot.

Here are the moves I do, in order, with notes as to why I felt the need to include them in my program.

Overhead press - obvious useful movement
Deadlift - again, obvious useful movement
Bench press - upper body strength for martial arts and carrying packs (you have to flex your pecs)
Dumbbell row - obvious useful movement. Drawing a bow, chainsaw, pullups...
Barbell curl - while at first I didn't think these were useful, I learned otherwise when many chores in hunting camp required essentially a bicep curl.
Weighted dip - assistance exercise for pressing strength, these also add tricep strength to balance out the bicep curls. Moving quartered game, logs, luggage and food items come to mind.
Full contact twist - both martial arts and hunting require being able to create a lot of torque around your trunk.
Upright row - this one again seemed at first like a useless bodybuilding movement, but hunting camp chores and the demands of hunting itself seemed to require fairly often that I do things resembling an upright row. I'm mostly thinking of moving and pouring water jugs.
Barbell shrug - big traps look cool.
Lateral raise - I often found my shoulders getting tired when dealing with the mules.
Dumbbell fly - Grabbing and lifting oddly shaped objects, such as rocks or people or large logs, requires strength of the traps that strongly resembles how a dumbbell fly feels.
Standing barbell French press - This is just more assistance work for the triceps. I am notoriously deficient in the triceps and notoriously overgrown in the biceps. I'd like to even that out someday.

You'll probably notice in a hurry that there is absolutely no squatting in my program, no is there anything even resembling a squat. That's because my kung fu already conditions the hell out of my legs to the point that I don't feel I need any extra leg strength. I had actually abandoned my kung fu leg conditioning in favor of squatting for several months prior to hunting, and I found in navigating deadfall that squatting didn't do half of what kung fu did for my mobility, speed and endurance. So, I resumed their leg conditioning practices.

Those practices are as follows:
Horse stance static hold, 45 minutes. image link
Bow and arrow stance static hold, 45 minutes each side. image link
250 front kicks, each leg.
250 side kicks, each leg.

I don't do nearly that much anymore, but that's the background of my leg conditioning. I do anywhere from a quarter of that to half of that on a regular basis, just to maintain myself. In addition, I will occasionally put an arm against a wall and raise one leg, then do 100 calf raises continually on just the one side, then repeat on the other side. This is to keep my calves springy and quick, so I can run and jump well. That's why I don't feel the need to squat anymore. Usually I will work my legs on the days I don't lift weights.

I do a whole bunch of other general conditioning and exercise. I stretch often to maintain my flexibility, something else I feel squatting interfered with. I also practice iron palm regularly.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2011, 01:10:28 PM by Spite »


Offline Spite

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Re: Spite's Workout Tracker
« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2011, 11:04:31 AM »
Yesterday I had to shovel a ditch. Since I have no setting between "off" and "high," I shoveled the hell out of it and got the whole thing done very quickly.

The gym was very interesting after having busted ass in the most functional of settings. My back was pretty well used, but I didn't feel it was used enough to interfere with my deadlifting. I actually made the executive decision not to deadlift based on how my legs and butt felt from stances the day before. I forgot how hard those friggin' stances were, in addition to my legs being dead the whole next day I was feeling spasms of pain in my butthole.

So, I decided based on how tired I felt that I was going to do something entirely uncharacteristic and focus only on a few exercises to hit mirror muscles, so that I would have a pump when I went out to see my friends that evening. There was something athletic planned among us and my protein intake for the day had been absolutely lame because my house was out of hamburgers. I think I was clocking about 70g by 5pm, which is crap. So, I figured I'd save my energy.

All I did was barbell shrugs, lat raises, dumbbell fly, curls and standing barbell french press. I also tried those little behind-the-back barbell wrist curl things and against all odds they felt pretty badass. I just wanted big forearms full of veins to show off to my friends and girlfriend for the evening, but they actually feel like they'll be useful for my wrist strength and for my deadlift. My fingers are already strong as balls, I feel like regular use of this variety of wrist curls would guarantee that I'd never have problems holding on to a deadlift ever again.

I just used the same sets/reps I have written down in my workout tracker, but of course I didn't count any of it towards progression to heavier weights, as doing a dumbbell fly after you just walk in is a whole different animal than doing a dumbbell fly after you've been overhead pressing, bench pressing, deadlifting and just generally lifting hard for an hour already. I'm sure that with sufficient protein and gym time everything will go back up to where it was before and higher.

I noticed that for some reason my right elbow really doesn't like barbell curls, so I may just stick with the dumbbells. Whatever is going on there doesn't seem to be aggravated by dumbbells.

I don't have a clear cut place in this journal entry to put it, but I feel the need to comment that I still strongly disagree with most of the people who discuss "functional fitness." I feel that while the process of shoveling is principally aided by having good repetition strength and endurance in the deadlift, my bench pressing ability, curling ability, lateral raising ability and dumbbell rowing ability strongly aided this as well. The full contact twist did too, but that move never seems to be in jeopardy of being deemed "non functional."

I also seem to be on a fairly spontaneous but fairly dedicated low carb stint. Suddenly I'm sick of potatoes, even when fried to crispy awesomeness in gallons of heavy olive oil. I've been replacing them with nut-grain bars and oatmeal as a carbohydrate source.

Today's breakfast: 2 hamburger patties fried in roughly 1 oz of EVOO and heavily spiced, then with two eggs scrambled in. Sprinkled lightly with shredded cheese. A mug of oatmeal on the side, because eating oatmeal out of mugs is amazing on cold winter mornings. A big shot of cod liver oil before eating, and a prenatal vitamin.

Total protein: 56 grams (daily goal: 150g minimum, 200g ideal)
Total carbohydrates: 15 grams (goal: 100 or less)
Total fat: 28g (goal: as much as I feel like)

Inflammation score: Pretty friggin' good, with all of that olive oil and spice. I could probably improve upon that by starting to just use the whites of my eggs, but that'd cut the protein in half. I understand most of the inflammatory agents in today's farm eggs come in the form of the fatty acids in the yolk. I think I may actually just start separating my eggs and eating more fish to compensate for it. Then my diet would pretty much be lean beef (noninflammatory) plus olive oil, a crapton of spices, fish and egg whites, all of which are retardedly antiinflammatory, falling just short of seal blubber.

It's truly a shame that such crap is fed to the animals in today's agricultural system, as it turns their fat into poison. Thanks to greed overtaking tradition and sensibility, eating the entire animal as we should would be to flip a coin on your survival prospects in a ten year scale. What's worse is that I don't see this situation improving any time soon. It's a great shame, but thankfully I'm becoming skillful at flourishing despite these challenges.